News
Opinion
Sports
Business
Community
entertainment
Schools
News
Announcements
Classifieds
Place Ad
Advertising
Contact Us
Archives
Search

schoolbriefs




• Cory Cook, a student at Farragut High School, has been selected to attend the 2006 Congressional Student Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. The Conference, sponsored by Lead America, is a college-accredited invitational program for academically talented and promising young leaders from across the United States and internationally. Exceptional high school students with records of academic achievement and extracurricular or community involvement are invited to participate. Cook will attend the Congressional Leadership University, an in-depth, intensive leadership development conference where young leaders challenge themselves to excel and realize their full potential. Students experience leadership in action and learn first hand about the complexities of decision making.

• The Teacher Supply Depot, 232 Churchwell Ave., will hold its second opening of the 2005-2006 school year. This free store for Knox County School teachers will open its doors from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 1. All Knox County school teachers in need of extra supplies for their classrooms are welcome to come and shop for free. It is typical for teachers to invest as much as $500-$700 of their personal funds on their classrooms each year. The Teacher Supply Depot was created in hopes of alleviating some of this financial burden by collecting usable items from local businesses and households to be offered to Knox County School Teachers. Donations are needed now. Donations of paper, glue, crayons, markets and other basic educational supplies are accepted at any time. The Teacher’s Supply Depot has been in operation since 2001. For more information, call 865-549-1221.

• The Tennessee Department of Education has embarked on a two-year project to improve the recruitment and retention of minority teachers across the state with the goal of maintaining a diverse teaching force reflective of Tennessee’s increasingly multi-cultural communities. A task force of state, local and higher education officials will compile successful models, locally and nationwide. The panel will develop a maketing campaign branding a diverse teaching force as the ideal, will recommend ways to improve data collection tracking diversity and will consider how to cultivate future minority teachers beginning in high school. The team is looking specifically at how to “grow” teachers who have a commitment to working in their home community, as well as encouraging successful paraprofessionals to pursue full licensure and a college degree. Potential strategies include enticing high schools to offer a class that introduces students to the teaching profession and financial incentive for paraprofessionals to go back to school. Some higher education institutions have already dedicated funds to assist minority students in becoming teachers. Minority students are eligible through the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation for a $5,000 annual award in exchange for completing a teacher education program and teaching one year in a Tennessee public school. The task force hoped its efforts will raise the visibility of the teaching profession, increase recruitment of diverse education leaders; and help grow existing grant programs. For more information, contact Gwen Watson at 615-532-4710.

• A group of Greenway School students won a $500 grant for their plan to improve literacy in inner-city elementary schools. The grant was awarded by Do Something, a nationwide organization that promotes youth activism in the community (www.dosomething.org). These middle school students are using the grant money to make audio CD recordings of books. More than 60 new books, the recorded CDs and 12 CD players soon will be donated to Knoxville elementary schools for use by young students learning to read. In the front of each book, the literacy project team plans to include a photo and brief biography of the reader who made the recording. Off-campus service learning is part of the curriculum at Greenway School, a private, independent middle school in West Knoxville. The grant was inspired by the Greenway students’ enjoyment of reading to Beaumont Magnet Elementary School children on many occasions.

• Education Commissioner Lana Seivers announced recently that the Tennessee Department of Education has partnered with the governor’s Office of Homeland Security and the University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center to train school officials to operate safe schools. The department is launching a new three-part training series to prepare school leaders in school security how to respond to emergency situations from natural disasters to safety threats. Experts in school safety from Knoxville and New York will lead the seminars. Gregory Thomas, director of school preparedness and planning at the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, works with schools across the nation in assessing and improving security. Knox County Schools’ Chief of Security, Steven Griffin, is a certified instructor for the National School Safety Center. Lieutenant Jeff Stiles is the director of training for the Knoxville Police Department and a member of their Special Operations Squad. District superintendents will be the first to participate in the day-long sessions that will be held in each of the three grand divisions. Participating directors will earn six hours CEO credit for attending. Subsequent sessions will target equipping other school personnel according to their respective roles. For more information, contact Mike Herrmann in the Office of School Safety at 615-741-8468 or Mike .Herrmann @state.tn.us .

• For many Webb School of Knoxville upperclassmen, a familiar faculty face has been missing from behind the podium in Room 7 of the Upper School’s junior hall this year. Longtime history teacher and Appalachian scholar, Dr. Mark Banker, has taken a one-year sabbatical to write “Appalachians All: East Tennesseans and the Elusive History of an American Region.” According to Banker, the book, to be published by University of Tennessee Press, evolved out of the course he teaches at Webb.

• Cory Cook, a student at Farragut High School, has been selected to attend the 2006 Congressional Student Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. The Conference, sponsored by Lead America, is a college-accredited invitational program for academically talented and promising young leaders from across the United States and internationally. Exceptional high school students with records of academic achievement and extracurricular or community involvement are invited to participate. Cook will attend the Congressional Leadership University, an in-depth, intensive leadership development conference where young leaders challenge themselves to excel and realize their full potential. Students experience leadership in action and learn first hand about the complexities of decision making.

 

News | Opinion | Sports | Business | Community | Schools | Obituaries | Announcements
Classifieds | Place Ad | Advertising | Contact Us | Archives | Search

© 2004-2014 farragutpress