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Farragut CVS, Johnson & Johnson address diabetes


CVS Pharmacy in Farragut plans to offer free blood glucose monitoring system machines to diabetic patients from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18.

Erika Murche, sales representative for Lifescan, will be at the store handing out the

glucometers.

“They are the One Touch Ultra Two model,” she said. “It has a few more options than the previous model.”

Shelia Spates, CVS pharmacist, said the giveaway is something other CVS stores have done.

“We have diabetic clients, so we thought this would be a good way to get people the information on diabetes they need,” she said.

Spates said she estimates 30 to 40 percent of the Farragut CVS pharmacy clients are filling prescriptions for diabetes related matters.

“Diabetes is becoming more and more a hot topic as obesity increases,” she said. “Obesity is on the rise.”

Diabetes is caused due to a body producing an insufficient amount of insulin to regulate blood sugar. Spates said Type I diabetes is the most serious. This is when the pancreas, which produces insulin, completely shuts down and makes the patient completely dependent on insulin shots to regulate blood sugar.

According to the American Diabetes Association, the total annual economic cost of diabetes in 2002 was estimated to be $132 billion.

Direct medical expenditures totaled $92 billion and comprised $23.2 billion for diabetes care, $24.6 billion for chronic diabetes-related complications, and $44.1 billion for excess prevalence of general medical conditions. Indirect costs resulting from lost workdays, restricted activity days, mortality and permanent disability due to diabetes totaled $40.8 billion.

The per capita annual costs of health care for people with diabetes rose from $10,071 in 1997 to $13,243 in 2002, an increase of more than 30 percent. In contrast, health care costs for people without diabetes amounted to $2,560 in 2002.

One out of every 10 health care dollars spent in the United States is spent on diabetes and its complications.

 

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