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letters to the editor


Alderman LaMarche responds, Concord Boat Storage discussed

Alderman LaMarche responds



I am writing in response to the recent letter written by Ralph W. Dimmick in the March 5 edition of the farragutpress.

Never have Aldermen [Thomas] Rosseel, [John] Williams or I committed the accusations that were levied against us. We have never and would never abuse the Sunshine Law. We took an oath of office as your aldermen to support and observe the provisions of the charter and ordinances of the town of Farragut and we have always done so.

Mr. Dimmick contacted me by phone to inquire about the Seal property adjacent to his own land. The only knowledge I was aware of at that time was a proposal for the town of Farragut to consider the purchase of the Seal property and donate the land to Knox County for a school. I told Mr. Dimmick I would support such a proposal and I felt that Aldermen Rosseel and Williams would also be in favor based on their comments made during their campaigns for office.

Since my election as alderman in Ward II, I have always striven to act with honesty and integrity. Farragut is my home and I will

always do my best to protect and uphold our

community.



Dot LaMarche

Farragut



Concord Boat Storage discussed



The main issue about the dry boat dock storage facility proposal is what happens in a long term drought?

If a four-story storage center is built and we have a severe drought problem then boating might not be an option. This would possibly lead to the company going out of business.

Furthermore with the price of gas getting so high many people will be cutting back on recreational spending. Especially that which involves gas!

The gamble of having the community pay for a possible abandoned eyesore at what was once the crown jewel of our parks is just not a risk at this time worth taking.



Dan Andrews

Knoxville



I have just finished reading the article in the March 6 edition of the farragutpress concerning the discussion between the Campbell brothers and Knox County ... .

I was in the boat manufacturing business for over 30 years so I love boating, and have a deep appreciation for those who want to expand the business.

However, I think one very important aspect of the discussion was completely overlooked.

A dry storage unit is one in which smaller boats are stacked in the facility, and it requires a rather large fork lift to both remove the boat from the storage unit, place it in the water and then return it to the facility once the customer is through for the day.

To my knowledge, it is required by law that a forklift such as this, operating in a public facility, have a large beeping horn when operating in reverse. This means that probably 50 percent of the time this beeping horn will be operational, as the forklift has to back up about half the time when putting each boat in the water. ... This means that during the summer, customers at Lakeside Tavern, those folks enjoying tennis, golf or the hiking trail, and the residents of Concord and the subdivision of Eagle Glen will all be subject to an incessant honking horn from morning till night.

Before the commissioners of Knox County, and Doug Bataille decide what to do, I would suggest they place one of [these] horns in their backyard, turn it on when they go to work in the morning and turn it off at night when they get home, and then see what your neighbors say.

Ernest J. Schmidt

Knoxville

 

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