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presstalk 671-TALK


• Via e-mail: Does anyone know who the man walking Concord Road is? He’s probably in his late 40s to early 50s, dark featured, and very, very thick mustache, except now he is growing a beard. My heart goes out to him. He walks daily, transporting his groceries and needs by foot. Anyone know him or know his story?

• Via e-mail: In further response to the barking dogs issues in Farragut, I submit these thoughts. Several readers responded last week with the logical thought of civilly knocking on your neighbor’s door and asking politely to curb the barking. But what is the next course of action when one politely asks four-to-five times not to be woken up in the middle of the night by their dog and the neighbor blasts you for having the audacity to challenge their right to have a dog and do what they will with it? It comes down to class and some have it and some don’t. As we have found, being able to generate income and live in a nice neighborhood does not equate to class. We live in a very nice community that “mandates” homeowner covenants that supposedly cover dog nuisances. One would think the board would enforce rules that were put in place to make the community as nice as possible — and all that live there agree in writing to abide by the rules. Unfortunately, many of the board members would rather placate to their buddies than follow the very clearly written rules that dogs shall not become a nuisance. Maybe your board has more integrity than ours. Neighbor-hoods with a homeowner association should not tolerate any violations. Once the association allows one rule to slide, the entire community becomes apathetic to all of the rules and any cohesion that existed is eroded. An undercurrent of dissatisfaction develops and the board does not even realize it or care until houses start popping up for sale and the neighborhood develops a very negative reputation perpetrated by former residents.

• Via e-mail: I am writing in response to the women who ordered the “littering Farragut student” out of his car. Although the student was clearly in the wrong to litter. No child (or person) should leave their vehicle when approached by an angry, combatent (sic) individual. Jumping out of a car in a line of traffic and ordering someone out of their car is not up to ordinary citizens; I believe the sheriff has that authority. This child was smart not to leave his vehicle for his own safety. The angry individual had other avenues to express their disgust and anger. Not pulling a young person out of their car in the middle of a traffic jam. It seems like she had her own agenda, i.e. “the bumper sticker.”

• This is in response to the person who keeps taking the political party sign from my yard. Two weeks in a row. Imagine not having the freedom of choice, being forced to vote. What makes this country great is having these and other great freedoms.

• Can we please get rid of one of those traffic lights in front of the new Kroger on Kingston Pike? Honestly, three traffic lights in less than two football field lengths? Let’s get rid of at least one of these lights.

• Glad to hear in presstalk that other neighbors are tired of the river-like yapping dog. Hope the owner reads presstalk and takes corrective action.

• If you’ve recently been burglarized in this area and previously had a delivery made to your home, please alert the police to this aspect of your burglary.

• I’m calling to respond to the liquor by the drink yea or nay [Through the Lens, 103008]. I say yea. In the [Through the Lens] picture, it announces that “would you like to have Lakeside Tavern be allowed to serve mixed beverages?” Well, my husband and I frequent that restaurant quite often and we’ve always been able to get a mixed beverage if we wanted to. I don’t understand, maybe you misprinted. However, on the whole I think that it is a good idea to be able to have liquor by the drink for the reasons that the owner of Aubrey’s [Randy Burleson] stated. And I hope that it gets passed.

Editor’s Note: Whoops, the egg is on our face. You are correct. Lakeside Tavern, which is located within a park in Knox County, outside Farragut and the City of Knoxville, enjoys a special Premier Resort status through special state legislation and holds its liquor-by-the-drink license through the City of Knoxville. Lakeside Tavern is the only establishment in Knox County privileged to do so under its specific criteria. Thank you for finding our error.

• On the note of responsible pet ownership and being a good neighbor, the two go hand-in-hand. If you’re not the first, you’re definitely not the second. It is dangerous to your neighbors as well as to your pets if you let them run loose. When you let dogs or cats run loose, they are more likely, of course, to be hit by a car or truck. They are more likely to be attacked and/or killed by larger animals. Opossums are very dangerous predators, especially to cats. Groundhogs are very dangerous predators to small dogs and cats, not to mention the multitudes of parasites that live in the grass and the trees. Fleas and ticks are just among the many, many that are out there. When you leave your dogs out all day and let them do nothing but bark, especially if they’ve not been neutered or spayed, it can help to develop aggressive tendencies in your animal, which of course can make them dangerous, not only to your neighbors, your neighbor’s pets and to you. Before you get a pet, sit down and really think about how much of your time and your life you are willing to commit to this life, because a pet is a life. Dogs and cats have the capacity for so much love. They also are much more intelligent than most people give them credit for. When you just stick them outside and don’t work with them, you don’t talk to them and you don’t give them the opportunity to develop their personality, then you have no one to blame but yourself when they get hurt, killed or attack someone else.

• I’m calling in reference to [Through the Lens] ... I think that people by law ought to be allowed to have whatever they like to have, if it’s a mixed drink or wine or beer. People shouldn’t be allowed to tell people what they [can] have.

 

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