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presstalk 671-TALK


• While my heart goes out to the families of Ed McMahon, Farrah Fawcett and Michael Jackson, I think all the hooplah leading up to the time of their deaths and after their deaths is inappropriate and, well, disgusting. Just because these people were famous does not make them saints. There are a lot of good, decent, caring, compassionate people out there who have given a lot more to their communities, to their friends and families than these people ever have. And yet, no one will give a rat’s behind when they die. People, put this into perspective: say a little prayer, light a candle, say you’re sorry. But let the people who actually knew them mourn them and move on to your own family, your own friends, and try doing something for your community instead of wailing and crying over people who … the only reason any of us knew they were dead was because they were famous and their faces had been plastered on magazines and on the TV for years. That is not the mark of a person. That is not the mark of their character or their legacy.

• I’ve sat back for a number of months relative to the islands that have been established on Grigsby Chapel/Smith Road, whichever you want to call it, that cuts through between Kingston Pike and Campbell Station Road, without calling in. However, it is obviously an engineering miss, and we’ve seen a number of accidents there as a result of these islands, which are basically an impingement on the traffic lanes. As a trial lawyer, [name omitted as per presstalk rules], I want to offer my service to anyone and everyone that has had an accident or had a close call relative to these particular islands, as they are clearly beyond recognizable engineering standards and are badly placed by the city of Farragut in this particular area. I regret this; I sat by and let it go and go and go until, quite frankly, it is just absolutely an engineering nuisance. I don’t know who designed these, but by [Golly], they ought to be hung by the yardarm. We need something done about these; these islands need to be removed immediately.

• I would like to ask the people of Farragut if they feel “it” slipping away. You ask what? I am talking about their Constitutional rights. Let me explain: our new Mayor [Ralph McGill], in his rush to action in his first city Board meeting, awarded a contract to Redflex for traffic light cameras. Our new mayor was recently quoted in the farragutpress while debating Ryan Haynes that “Where in the constitution does it give anyone the right to run traffic lights?” Does our mayor know so little about the Constitution? Or was he just trying to be a comedian? First, Mr. Mayor, there were no traffic cameras when the Constitution was written. Second, there was no traffic. But the cameras you are so quick to install do violate our Constitutional rights: the right to face your accuser in a court of law. You may say you have the right to fight the ticket in court; however, it will cost you approximately a day of your time and even if you win, court costs will still be assessed in excess of the ticket amount. In other words, we have installed a system that costs more money if you fight it. Is this how the American legal system was intended to work? I think not. This is nothing more than unabated fee-grabbing.

Editor’s Note: farragutpress did not report or print that state Rep. Ryan Haynes was present at the Board of Mayor and Aldermen meeting debating the mayor. Nor did farragutpress print the above mentioned quote attributed to the mayor. Most alleged traffic violators who choose not to plead guilty and remit fines have to take time to appear in court and at that time are afforded their “right” to meet the officer who authorized the ticket.

• I would like to answer the person who in this last week’s [farragutpress] was telling the residents of Belleaire to “chill.” Number one, you need to go back and read the comments of one of my neighbors the week before last. They didn’t say a thing about the entrance to Belleaire [Drive]. The signs they are referring to are on the hill on the upper side of Belleaire Drive, and they’ve been there for months. I have to admit, I’m wondering too why they are there. And I have to admit, I wonder if there’s going to be more construction or something going on that we don’t know about, that no one’s bothered to tell us about. So, before you tell us to “chill,” why don’t you read thoroughly and then check out what somebody is asking about. We’d just like to know what’s going on. It’s our community; it’s our families, our friends, we live there. We have the right to know what’s going on. So why don’t you chill?

• Via e-mail: Whomever was in charge of the parade should never be allowed to do it again! Starting one hour late is inexcusable. You caused seniors and small children to be there more than three hours for the total parade. That’s ridiculous! I was embarrassed for Farragut for the long delay. When you advertise starting at 9 a.m., that parade should start at 9 a.m., 9:15 at the latest. Very poor showing.

Editor’s Note: farragutpress published the times of the parade several times prior to July 2. Kingston Pike was closed to through traffic at 8:30 a.m., the parade was to start moving at 9:30 a.m. Our staff noted the Knox County Sheriff’s Office, which led the parade, was in place at 9:30 a.m. and began moving at 9:35 a.m. All the information received from the town of Farragut confirmed the anticipated road closing and start times.

• Via e-mail: Hurrah for my fellow AARP friend who correctly pointed out that we have the RIGHT to go as slow as we see fit on Campbell Station Road now that the mayor has built these concrete islands of safety. When the other person mentioned that he goes 25 miles an hour on that road, I thought “yes,” finally somebody who really knows what the law is. Just because the limit is 40 miles an hour does not mean you should be going that speed. Just because the highway says 70 miles an hour does not mean that you should be going that speed either. Back in the ’40s we all learned in school that you should always go about 20 miles an hour less than the posted limit for the best safety. So, yes, I agree that 25 miles an hour is a good rule of thumb for Campbell Station. I am just pleased that that younger 50 year old with his sports car cannot swerve in front of me with these new safety islands built. He just needs to control his rage.

Editor’s Note: From www.state.

tn.us/safety/dlhandbook/menu.htm, the 2007 Driver License Study Guide, Chapter 4 “Rules of the Road,” pages 20 and 21, “Slow-Moving Vehicles:” “It is against the law to drive slower than the posted minimum speed under normal driving conditions. You may drive more slowly than the minimum speed if you are driving in bad weather, heavy traffic or on a bad road. If there is no posted minimum speed, it is still against the law to drive so slowly that you block traffic. NOTE: You are considered to be driving a slow-moving vehicle if you are traveling at a rate of speed that is 10 miles per hour or more below the lawful maximum speed. If five or more vehicles are lined up behind you, turn or pull off the roadway as soon as you can do so safely. Slow drivers, who block other traffic, cause many accidents. Remember, slower is not always safer.”

• Via e-mail: The traffic circle at Concord [Road] and Northshore [Drive] does help the traffic flow, but it’s not safe. I have had three near accidents there, and my friend has had the same experience. While I’m already in the traffic circle, cars coming from the Lenoir City direction [eastbound] will not slow down at the yield sign. When they see me in the circle, they speed up so they can cut me off, and get in front of me. I’m scared for myself and my 2-year-old. Roundabouts are only safe if people follow the rules. Traffic in the circle has the right-of-way.

Editor’s Note: These drivers of which you refer probably are the same ones who drive through red lights and stop signs causing accidents and harming others. This is one of the reasons the town of Farragut has decided to install red light cameras on several intersections in Town.

 

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